Identifying Weaknesses in Your Current Warehouse Operations

If your goal as a warehouse operations manager is to use the physical space, equipment and labor resources you’ve been allocated to meet the needs of your organization’s customers, then achieving your goal requires you to get comfortable with ongoing change. Today, more organizations are taking a serious look at the impact their warehouse has on their bottom line and recognize that their operations have the potential to become not only a competitive advantage, but a growth enabler.

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Strategy and Management Services, Inc. (SAMS) Awarded Contract to Support U.S. Army

Firm will leverage partnership with NCN Technology, a Small Business Administration (SBA) 8(a) Protégé

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Rule #100 - Become a Thought Leader

Do you want to increase your brand awareness and assert yourself as a top business leader? Start with thought leadership. Thought leadership is one of the strongest approaches to creating new business prospects and becoming an influential subject matter expert in your industry. By garnering your experiences and technical knowledge and sharing it with colleagues through articles, or something as simple as a Redmon’s Rule, you can become instrumental in advancing your field by producing and adding value to your target audience.

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What’s Trending? Call Centers are Returning to the U.S.

Whether you run a small business or large enterprise organization, your call center is a critical customer touch point. To improve the call center experience and drive higher levels of customer loyalty and satisfaction, companies are reinvesting in their centers, deploying new technologies, and implementing advanced customer relationship management tools to better understand their customers. And, they are moving their operations back onshore to the U.S.

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Rule #99 - You Don’t Have to Go it On Your Own

Sometimes leaders try to take everything on themselves. But that’s not leading, that’s failing to delegate. You can’t do it all on your own. Let your staff do what they do best, and find business partners and employees who can balance out your weaknesses. There’s a time tested African proverb that says, “If you want to go quickly, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.”

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Rule #98 - Know Your Customer

This is a time honored chestnut, but remains as true as ever. How many businesses fail to understand what their customers’ lives are really like? What are their pain points? What keeps them awake at night? Answer these questions and you’ll discover what customers are really looking for in your product or service.

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Do Corporate Volunteer Programs Really Make a Difference?

As more companies rush to invest in volunteer programs to boost their employees’ engagement and development, raise the level and quality of their recruits, and even drive sales, measuring a program’s value is often an afterthought. So, how does a company evaluate whether the employee program it has carefully crafted is hitting the mark and generating results?

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Rule #97 - Look for Alternative Methods

When it comes to innovation, people often think of new inventions and modern technology. However, some of the most innovative ideas include processes and improved methods. It’s important to encourage your team to discover alternative ways to complete projects that may be more efficient and less time consuming, saving your clients time and money. Don’t let team members get stuck in a rut of performing projects a specific way because that’s how it has always been done. Help your team stretch their minds and explore alternative ideas.

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Rule #96 - Make Credibility Your Credo

Credibility can be defined as the power of inspiring belief. It is at the core of all relationships, and once you lose it, it can be the hardest thing to get back. Living up to clients’ expectations can be challenging at times, but if you maintain your credibility as true, real and honest, you are demonstrating the qualities of a strong leader.

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Innovation or Incineration: How companies that don’t innovate don’t last.

It’s been nearly two decades since Michael E. Porter, Bishop William Lawrence University Professor at Harvard Business School wrote “The Competitive Advantage of Nations.” Porter’s groundbreaking study of international competitiveness outlined how a nation’s competitiveness depends on the capacity of its industry to innovate and upgrade. It transformed how companies think and act when it comes to innovation. Innovation, he noted, is rather ordinary and typically comes about in incremental steps or through the snowball effect of multiple small insights rather than a big bang event such as a single, major technological breakthrough. That point is still being debated, especially when you consider the success of disruptive companies like Apple, Uber, Amazon and Google. But what was relevant then and continues to be today, is Porter’s observation that innovation always involves companies investing in skill and knowledge.

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